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-r, --reference=File Display the last modification time of File -R, --rfc-822 Output RFC-822 compliant date string Example: Mon, -0600 -s, --set=String Set time described by String (see -d above) -u, --utc, --universal Print or set Coordinated Universal Time --help Display this help and exit --version output version information and exit Date: D Date in mm/dd/yy format (06/24/13) x Date in standard format for locale (09/24/13 for English-US) Year: C Century () Y Year in 4-digit format (2015) y Year in 2-digit format (14) G Same as 'Y' g Same as 'y' Month: b Month name - abbreviated (Jan) B Month name - full (January) h Same as 'b' m Month number (09) Week: W Week of the year (00-52) V Week of the year (01-53) If the week containing January 1 has four or more days in the new year, then it is considered week 1; otherwise, it is week 53 of the previous year, and the next week is week 1.Similar to ISO 8601 (but not 100% compliant.) U Same as 'W' Day: a Day of the week - abbreviated name (Mon) A Day of the week - full name (Monday) u Day of the week - number (Monday = 1) d Day of the month - 2 digits (05) e Day of the month - digit preceded by a space ( 5) j Day of the year - (1-366) w Same as 'u' Time: p AM or PM r Time in 12-hour format ( AM) R Time in 24-hour format - no seconds () T Time in 24 hour format () X Same as 'T' Z Time offset from UTC (-07) This generally consists of Time Zone+ Hour: H Hour in 24-hour format (17) I Hour in 12 hour format (05) k Same as 'H' l Same as 'I' (Upper-case I = Lower-case L) Minutes & Seconds: M Minutes (35) S Seconds (05) s Seconds elapsed since January 1, 1970 GMT (Unix time) %% a literal % %a locale's abbreviated weekday name (Sun..

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Saturday) %b locale's abbreviated month name (Jan..

Dec) %B locale's full month name, variable length (January..

December) %c locale's date and time (Sat Nov 04 EST 1989) %d day of month (01..31) %D date (mm/dd/yy) %e day of month, blank padded ( 1..31) %h same as %b, locale's abbreviated month name (Jan..

Dec) %H hour :24 hour(00..23) %I hour :12 hour(01..12) %j day of year (001..366) %k hour :24 hour(00..23) %l hour :12 hour(01..12) %m month (01..12) %M minute (00..59) %n a newline %p locale's AM or PM %r Time, 12-hour (hh:mm:ss [AP]M) %s Seconds since 1970-01-01 , (a GNU extension) Note that this value is defined by the localtime system call. %S second (00..60) %t a horizontal tab %T Time, 24-hour (hh:mm:ss) %U Week number of year with Sunday as first day of week (00..53) %V Week number of year with Monday as first day of week (01..53) If the week containing January 1 has four or more days in the new year, then it is considered week 1; otherwise, it is week 53 of the previous year, and the next week is week 1.

Options: -d, --date=String Display time described by String, instead of 'now' this can be in almost any common format.

It can contain month names, timezones, 'am' and 'pm', 'yesterday', 'ago', 'next', etc.

-f, --file=Date File like --date once for each line of Date File If Date File is '-', use standard input.

This is useful when you have many dates to process, because the system overhead of starting up the 'date' executable many times can be considerable.

-I, --iso-8601[=Timespec] Output an ISO 8601 compliant date/time string., '%Y-%m-%d'.

Timespec='date' (or missing) for date only, 'hours', 'minutes', or 'seconds' for date and time to the indicated precision.

If showing any time terms, then include the time zone using the format '%z'.

If '--utc' is also specified, use '%Z' in place of '%z'.