I like to chat with a mom about sex and pussy

23-Sep-2015 15:38 by 6 Comments

I like to chat with a mom about sex and pussy - singlenet dating s

Now, you can never protect your child fully from ever being molested.But you can do a lot to reduce your child’s vulnerability to sexual abuse and increase the chances they’ll tell you after something happens.

The idea of talking to your kid about sexual abuse probably seems worse than even talking to them about sex.You don’t want to scare them (or yourself) in the process. You don’t want to introduce them to how much violence and abuse there is in the world.But given the statistics, your child is much more likely to be molested than to be hit by a car when crossing the street.So try thinking of these conversations as being just as important (and frankly more important given the statistics) than teaching your child how to cross the road safely.The idea of someone molesting your child is terrifying for any parent (unless the parent is the child molester, which is 37% of the time).The pain, fear, and trauma they may experience at such a young age are frightening to consider.

It’s enough to make any parent freak out and want to never ever think about it again.And then we hope it will just never happen to our own child.Except your daughter has a 1 in 4 chance and your son has a 1 in 6 chance of being molested before the age of 18. And these statistics are too high for any parent to risk staying uninformed about the reality of child sexual abuse and not talking to their child about it.According to a studied reported by TIME magazine, gender non-conforming children assigned male at birth are “nearly three times as likely to suffer sexual abuse in childhood compared with gender-typical boys” while gender non-conforming children assigned female at birth are “60% more likely to be abused sexually than conforming girls.” Children with disabilities are 2.9 times more likely than children without disabilities to be sexually abused. On top of that, the majority of children never report sexual abuse when it’s happening.They’re often afraid of their parents’ reactions or fear getting into trouble.They don’t know how to explain what happened to them or believe what the abuser told them to keep them quiet.